June 25, 2019

Frank Cousin's Salem


The Phillips Library recently announced the digitization of their Frank Cousins and Herman Parker collections, now available on Digital Commonwealth. In celebration of this, I have teamed up with Dr. Donna Seger of Streets of Salem to compare our top ten picks from the over 2,000 photographs dated between 1865-1914. I'm very curious to see if we choose any of the same images! 

Here are a few of my favorite photographs from the Frank Cousins Collection:

Group, John R. Treadwell, janitor and John J. Connors, constable, Peabody Museum
Group, John R. Treadwell, janitor and John J. Connors, constable, Peabody Museum
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Salem, Juniper Point, views, from tower of Pavilion
Salem, Juniper Point, views, from tower of Pavilion
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Salem, 134 Essex Street, Plummer Hall, 1856, interior
Salem, 134 Essex Street, Plummer Hall, 1856, interior (Salem Athenaeum)
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Salem, 204-206 Essex Street, Ezekiel Hersey Derby house, 1800, by Samuel McIntire
Salem, 204-206 Essex Street, Ezekiel Hersey Derby house, 1800, by Samuel McIntire
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Salem, 27 Gardner Street, William Bickerton house
Salem, 27 Gardner Street, William Bickerton house
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Salem, 4 1/2 Federal Street, Abner Goodell house, interior library
Salem, 4 1/2 Federal Street, Abner Goodell house, interior library
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Salem, North Street from Bridge Street, view, ward 6
Salem, North Street from Bridge Street, view, ward 6
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Salem, 43 Essex Street at Hardy Steet, Edwards Market
Salem, 43 Essex Street at Hardy Steet, Edwards Market
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Salem, 145 Essex Institute, Lynde Block
Salem, 145 Essex Institute, Lynde Block
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Salem, Ward 1, views from Custom House
Salem, Ward 1, views from Custom House
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Don't forget to see what Dr. Seger picked over on Streets of Salem and then browse the collections yourself and let us know your top picks!



June 5, 2019

Resource Guide - Polish Community of Salem, Massachusetts



Polish Industrial Bank on Derby Street, c. 1920s
Salem State University Archives and Special Collections

In the early 20th century, Salem's Historic Derby Street Neighborhood was predominantly Polish. Attracted to job opportunities in the city’s mills and factories, Polish immigrants began arriving in Salem around 1890 and by 1911, Poles comprised about 8% of the city’s overall population. Religion played a strong role in the Polish community and as the number of Polish Catholics in Salem grew, the need for a permanent house of worship became apparent. Herbert Street and Union Street became the heart of the Polish Catholic presence in the city, after the opening of St. John the Baptist Church, a parochial school, convent, and rectory. St. John the Baptist’s Reverend John Czubek was a central figure in this community, marrying or baptizing many of Salem’s Poles. 

The new church increased the settlement of Polish immigrants in the neighborhood and multiple single-family homes were converted or replaced with multi-family tenements to house the growing population. The neighborhood became a tight knit hub of all Polish activities. Multiple shops, restaurants, and social clubs lined Derby Street and its offshoots, catering to Poles from all regions and religions. The House of the Seven Gables, the namesake of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1851 novel, played a crucial role in this community. Caroline Emmerton opened the museum in 1910 to support her adjacent settlement house, which provided classes and workshops to the local immigrant community, a role the museum still honors to this day.

In 1976, The Historic Derby Street Neighborhood was designated a National Historic District due in large part to the hard work of neighborhood residents, led by sisters Alice and Dolores Jordan.

Resources for the history of Poles in Salem, Massachusetts: